Ashmolean Museum : 6 expositions virtuelles du Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art

Le Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art offre un accès en ligne aux collections du département d’art oriental de l’Ashmolean Museum à Oxford. L’APAMi vous a sélectionné six expositions virtuelles à explorer depuis chez soi !

Continuer la lecture de « Ashmolean Museum : 6 expositions virtuelles du Yousef Jameel Centre for Islamic and Asian Art »

Lectures at the KRC, Oxford – 2020

The KRC offers severals types of lectures
Teaching staff involved in this term’s lectures – Professor Alain George, Professor Zeynep Yürekli-Görkay, Dr Umberto Bongianino, Dr Luke Treadwell, Dr Teresa Fitzherbert

Introduction to Islamic Art & Architecture
KRC lecture room, Tuesdays 15.00 – 17.00 hrs, Alain George, Umberto Bongianino, Luke Treadwell, Zeynep Yürekli-Görkay, and Teresa Fitzherbert

Week 1 (21 January): Fatimid Architecture and its Messages (Umberto Bongianino)

Week 2 (28 January): Images of Sovereignty from the Abbasids to the Seljuqs: The Evidence of the Coinage (Luke Treadwell)

Week 3 (4 February): The Seljuq Empire and its Legacy (Zeynep Yürekli-Görkay)

Week 4 (11 February): Figural Art and Manuscript Illustration in the Near East (Zeynep Yürekli-Görkay)

Week 5 (18 February): India from Early Islam to the Sultanates (Alain George)

Week 6 (25 February): The Arts under the Almoravids and Almohads (Umberto Bongianino)

Week 7 (3 March): Iran under Mongol Rule (Teresa Fitzherbert)

Week 8 (10 March): The Mamluk “Public Text”: Epigraphy and Calligraphy (Umberto Bongianino)

Approaches to Islamic Art & Architecture (Weeks 2,4,6,8)
KRC lecture room, Thursdays 14.00 – 16.00 hrs, Alain George, Umberto Bongianino, Luke Treadwell, and Zeynep Yürekli-Görkay

Week 2 (30 January): Museums and Collections (Luke Treadwell)

Week 4 (13 February): Islamic Aesthetics (Alain George)

Week 6 (27 February): Beauty and the Qur’an (Alain George)

Week 8 (12 March): Travellers’ Perceptions of the Built Environment (Umberto Bongianino and Zeynep Yürekli-Görkay)

KRC Research Seminars
KRC Lecture Room, Thursdays, 17:15-18:30 hrs
Convenor: Umberto Bongianino

Week 1 (23 January): Christian Sahner (St Cross College): New thoughts about the edict of Yazid II (ca. 723) and Palestinian iconoclasm

Week 2 (30 January): Nilay Özlü (KRC Barakat Postdoctoral Scholar): Displaying the Royal Collections of the Topkapi Palace: The Imperial Treasury, the Chamber of Sacred Relics, and the Ottoman Imperial Museum

Week 3 (6 February): Jeremy Johns (KRC, Wolfson College): How to create a new multicultural art form: the opus sectile Arabic verse inscriptions from Norman Sicily

Week 4 (13 February): Karin Scheper (Leiden University): In Search of Local Characteristics: Manuscript making in the Islamic world

Week 5 (20 February): Ronny Vollandt (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich): Palimpsests from the Cairo Genizah and the Qubbat al-Khazna

Week 6 (27 February): Yusen Yu (Corpus Christi College): Ways of Viewing: Persianate Reception of Chinese Painting (15th to mid-16th Centuries)

Week 7 (5 March): Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute): The Palace of Pedro I in Seville: Ornament and Epigraphy between Granada and Toledo

Week 8 (12 March): Atri Hatef Naiemi (KRC Barakat Postdoctoral Fellow): A Dialogue between Friends and Foes: Transcultural Interactions in Ilkhanid Capital Cities (1256-1335 AD) 

More infos

The Khalili Research Centre
3 St John Street
Oxford, OX1 2LG
Tel. +44 (0)1865 278222
krc@orinst.ox.ac.uk

Conférence – Displaying the Royal Collections of the Topkapi Palace: The Imperial Treasury, the Chamber of Sacred Relics, and the Ottoman Imperial Museum – 30 January 17:15 Nilay Özlü (KRC Barakat Postdoctoral Scholar)

KRC Research Seminars
KRC Lecture Room, Thursdays, 17:15-18:30 hrs
Convenor: Umberto Bongianino

This presentation will discuss the politics of collecting and display in the late Ottoman context and will focus on different collections that were held and displayed at three royal pavilions in the Topkapi Palace: The Fatih Kiosk, the Privy Chamber, and the Tiled Pavilion. The functions of all three pavilions, originally built by Mehmed II (the Conqueror) in the 15th century, have changed within centuries and they ended up housing various royal collections and treasuries. By the 19th century, these pavilions –and the collections within– were being visited by diverse audiences; and different display techniques were adopted that conveyed multiple narratives of modernity, tradition, heritage, dynastic continuity, and authority.

The Khalili Research Centre
3 St John Street
Oxford, OX1 2LG
Tel. +44 (0)1865 278222
krc@orinst.ox.ac.uk

More infos